BENCH PRESS

 
 

Power and the Muscular Body

 
Anon. "Three Neck Exercises" nd

Anonymous.
"Three neck exercises with
helmet and wall pulley."
n.d.

Anonymous.
"The forearm of Robert L. Jones
showing development as a
result of finger balancing."
n.d.

Anon. "The Forearm of Rovert L. Jones" nd

 

 

Increasingly, the body was not only able to exercise on its way to muscularity it was also able to exercise the ritual semiotic language of the hyper-masculine body as power over the social body in general. A sociology of the body was constructed based on the interaction with history, memory and context. Men sought to transform their body and the social body through the structures and rituals of power, naming deviants such as homosexuals as 'other' and therefore reducing them to an inferior status. It is not surprising that homosexual men are attracted to this power. For a long time they have been subject to persecution and derision, seeing themselves as inferior men. Now, with the adoption of hyper-masculine bodies as the epitome of gay male image, gay men seek to be 'real' men perhaps even more than straight men. Unfortunately this may reinforce traditional patriarchal stereotypes within the gay community, a community that portrays itself as supporting equality and diversity, that prides itself on these qualities. The very things that homosexuals have long fought against - oppression and discrimination - is confirmed within the gay community in the exercising of power by 'ideal' images of the muscular body over other, alternative images of the male body.

 

Anon. "Bill Good executing Free Motion Exercises" nd
Anon. "Bill Good executing Stretching Exercise course" nd

 

Anonymous.
"Bill Good executing
Free Motion Exercises."
n.d.

 

 

Anonymous.
"Bill Good executing
Stretching Exercise course."
n.d.