HISTORICAL PRESSINGS

 

Fred Holland Day "St. Sebastian" c.1906

 

Fred Holland Day "Nude Youth with Lyre" 1907

 

Frederick Holland Day.
"Saint Sebastian."
Platinum print.
c.1906

 

Frederick Holland Day.
"Nude Youth with Lyre."
Platinum print.
1907

 

 

Two of the most famous photographers of the late Victorian and early Edwardian era who used the male body in their work were Frederick Holland Day in America and Baron Wilhelm von Gloeden in Europe.

Frederick Holland Day's photographs of the male body concentrated on mythological and religious subject matter. In these photographs he tried to reveal a transcendence of spirit through an aesthetic vision of androgynous physical perfection. He revelled in the sensuous hedonistic beauty of what he saw as the perfection of the youthful male body. In the photograph "St. Sebastian," for example, the young male body is presented for our gaze in the combined ecstasy and agony of suffering. In his mythological photographs Holland Day used the idealism of Ancient Greece as the basis for his directed and staged images. These are not the bodies of muscular men but of youthful boys (ephebes) in their adolescence; they seem to have an ambiguous sexuality. The models genitalia are rarely shown and when they are, the penis is usually hidden in dark shadow, imbuing the photographs with a sexual mystery. The images are suffused with an erotic beauty of the male body never seen before, a photographic reflection of a seductive utopian beauty seen through the desiring eye of a homosexual photographer.

 

von Gloeden "Untitled" c.1900
 

von Gloeden "Untitled" c.1890

 

 

Wilhelm von Gloeden.
"Untitled."
c.1900
 

 

 

Wilhelm von Gloeden.
"Untitled."
Albumen print.
c.1890

 

 

In Europe Wilhelm von Gloeden's photographs of young ephebes (males between boy and man) have a much more open and confronting sexual presence. Using heavily set Sicilian peasant youths with rough hands and feet von Gloeden turned these bodies into heroic images of Grecian legend, usually photographing his nude figures in their entirety. In undertaking research into von Gloeden's photographs at The Kinsey Institute, I was quite surprised at how little von Gloeden used classical props such as togas and vases in his photographs, relying instead on just the form of the body with perhaps a ribbon in the hair. His photographs depict the penis and the male rump quite openly and he hints at possible erotic sexual encounters between models through their intimate gaze and physical contact (see above photographs). The photographs were collected by some people for their chaste and idyllic nature but for others, such as homosexual men, there is a subtext of latent homo-eroticism present in the positioning and presentation of the youthful male body. The imagery of the penis and the male rump can be seen as totally innocent, but to homosexual men desire can be aroused by the depiction of such erogenous zones within these photographs.

In both photographers work there is a reliance on the 'natural' body. In von Gloeden's case it is the smooth peasant body with rough hands and feet; in Holland Day's it is the smooth sinuous body of the adolescent. At the same time in both Europe and America, however, there began to emerge a new form for the body of a man, that of the muscular mesomorph, the V-shaped masculine 'ideal' expressed through the image of the bodybuilder, photographed in all his muscular splendour!